Monday, April 30, 2007

Postal Marking

A postage stamp is proof of pre-paying a fee for postal services. Usually a small paper rectangle which is attached to an envelope, signifying that the person sending the letter or package has paid for delivery; it is the most popular option to using a prepaid-postage envelope.


In it he argued that it would be well again for the sender to pay the cost of delivery, rather than the addressee who could refuse the letter if they could not or did not want to pay, as occasionally happened at the time. He also argued for a identical rate of one penny per letter, no matter where its end. Accounting costs for the government would thus be cut; postage would no longer be charged according to how far a letter had traveled, which necessary each letter to have an individual entry in the Royal Mail's accounts. Chalmers' ideas were finally adopted by Parliament in August, 1839 and the General Post Office launched the Penny Post service the next year in 1840 with two prepaid-postage symbolic envelopes or wrappers: one valued at a penny and one valued at two pence.

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